Teacher Helps Page for Ignite

Check this page periodically for items that will support your Ignite planning.

Click to see Teacher Helps:

Chapter 1        Chapter 2        Chapter 3        Chapter 4        Chapter 5        Chapter 6

Chapter 7        Chapter 8        Chapter 9        Chapter 10      Chapter 11      Chapter 12


Vol. 6, Chap. 1 - It Takes a Village 

  • Background Information:
    • Gennady and Mina Podgaisky, from Russia and Mexico (respectively), met when they attended seminary in Kentucky. After they married and finished their degrees, Gennady and Mina were led by God to ministry among the thousands of children between the ages of three and fifteen who live on or under the streets of Kiev, Ukraine. In Kiev alone, it is estimated that there were at one time as many as 24,000 children who did not have homes. In the last decade, the situation has improved, but there are still thousands of street children in Ukraine. Many of the children are orphans. Some have been abandoned by their families, while others are fleeing from abusive situations. These children live together in groups in basements or underground heating tunnels. Often older siblings care for younger siblings as they live on the streets. The children are cold for much of the year, and many sniff glue regularly to escape their reality.
      In 2002, the Ukrainian Baptist Union and CBF formed a partnership to minister to the needs of Kiev’s street children. The Cooperative Baptist Fellowship commissioned Gennady and Mina Podgaisky to serve in Ukraine and work to meet physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of people in Ukraine’s capital city. At feeding stations, the Podgaiskys are able to meet some of the needs of the street children. They give away warm clothes, serve hot meals, administer medical care, and provide funds for legal help. Through the feeding stations, the Podgaiskys are able to form relationships with some of these children and share the warmth and hospitality of God’s love.
      The Podgaiskys were instrumental in founding the Village of Hope. Purchased in 2003, this former youth camp is being restored and reclaimed as a foster home. Since 2003, mission teams have traveled to Ukraine to landscape, renovate, and rebuild the buildings at the camp. The vision of the Village of Hope is to provide a place where Christian foster parents can create a home for some of the children living on the street and give them the nurture and love that they deserve. Each foster family can take five to seven foster children in addition to their own biological children. The camp could eventually house up to 10 families and 100 children. As construction on various buildings at the Village is completed, there will be more space for foster parents to offer a refuge to children in need of a loving home environment. The Village of Hope also serves as a site for Christian camps conducted year-round by the Ukrainian Center for Christian Cooperation.
      In addition to work at the Village of Hope, the Podgaiskys have been active in a coalition of non-profit organizations that minister to at-risk children, have helped develop a Life Skills Manual that is used by children and youth throughout Ukraine, and have continued to share the gospel through their day-to-day relationships and weekly Bible studies in their home.
  • Session 1:
  • Session 2:
    • engage - Casting Crowns' "If We Are the Body" video and lyrics
  • Missional Activity:
    • This chapter of Ignite suggests hosting a car wash as a way to share God's love with your community. Click here for an online resource with tips for planning the logistics of your group's car wash. While many organizations plan a car wash to raise funds, the purpose of this missional activity is to give the service freely "to those God loves." So, skip the part in the guide about profit and selling tickets.



Vol. 6, Chap. 2 - In Union with God's Mission
  • Background Information
    • In eastern North Carolina, Anna and LaCount Anderson are two of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship's field personnel working to minister to those in poverty. They are giving help and sharing God’s love to those in need in several of the communities near Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina. Northeastern North Carolina is dealing with great economic difficulty. In the Andersons’ county, 24% of the population is living in poverty.
      In 2009 they began the Eastern North Carolina Poverty Network which is helping people in poverty while partnering with churches in their area. LaCount serves as the executive director of Union Mission, which houses a long-term residential recovery program for men. Anna serves as the minister of music and missions at Rosemary Baptist Church in Roanoke Rapids and assists in the work of Faith House, a homeless shelter for women and children in Enfield, NC. They are also beginning community gardens in several areas to provide for those who are hungry. Vacation Bible School and after-school music programs have touched the lives of children. They both are part of the Transformational Development Team of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship (CBF) with other CBF field personnel who are seeking to move people out of poverty.
      Anna and LaCount’s ministry is based on relationships. “It is not us (rich) and them (poor). It is all of us, from God’s perspective,” said Anna. “People in need have talent and ability to help in church. Our job is to show them the way to God and then involve them in local church ministry.”
      Anna and LaCount strive to help those in poverty in their community, but their larger goal is to help churches know how to impact their communities. They are seeking to help congregations and individuals to be the presence of Christ in their own communities. They assist them in matching resources and abilities with the greatest needs of those in poverty. Anna shares, “I have such a desire to see churches do more, understand where and how they can serve God, and use more of what they’ve been given.” This unit will challenge youth to make an impact in their own backyard.
  • Session 1
  • Session 2
  • Session 3
  • Missional Activity
    • This month youth are encouraged to organize and conduct a "Parking Lot Garden Harvest Festival." This is a unique take on a traditional canned food drive. Be sure that you ask the agency/organization who you partner with if they have any specific food needs or requests. Also involve your youth in distributing the food.  


Vol. 6, Chap. 3 - Finding Refuge and Strength
  • Background Information
    • For a refugee from a war-torn country, finding family can be difficult or even impossible. Unfortunately, this is a situation faced by many, many people in several different countries in Africa. Jade and Shelah Acker, two of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship’s field personnel, minister to people who have been displaced and affected by conflict.
      In 2001, the Ackers were living in Sudan working at a camp for former child soldiers. They formed strong relationships with some of the boys and got to know their stories. When the camp closed, they moved to another part of Sudan to work on a relief project. They found several of the boys from the camp there living on the streets and were able to advocate for them. In 2003, the Ackers arranged for nine of the boys to go to school in Kenya.
      The Ackers were commissioned as CBF field personnel in 2004. After several years in Senegal, they moved to Uganda in 2008. The Ackers have two young daughters, Anna-Grace and Kaelah-Joy, and they have legal guardianship of Lino, a teen boy originally from Sudan. The nine young men they helped earlier were able to continue their education, and many of them desired to return to their countries to make a difference there. Five of the boys have moved to Uganda to be near the Ackers and are part of their extended family.
      The Ackers founded and co-direct a non-profit organization called Refuge and Hope International. While the ministries of Refuge and Hope International extend beyond Uganda into Sudan, Kenya, and the Congo, much of the Ackers’ daily life happens at the Center of Hope located in Kampala, Uganda. The Center of Hope offers refugees from Sudan, Eritrea, the Congo, and local Ugandans training in many different areas including English, computer, Bible study, and sewing. In addition, Jade runs an active sports ministry through the Center as a way to reach out to the young men of the community. In the Ugandan village of Greek, the Ackers are working to construct a community center, which can be a school and a place of worship. In the Kaberamaido district in Uganda, they are training widows and former soldiers in agricultural methods to create income and improve life.
  • Session 1
  • Missional Activity 
    • Ask youth to "commit to caring" in the next month - to meet the physical need of one person in your congregation. Also, consider planning a fundraising event with youth for the CBF Offering for Global Missions, or have youth promote the offering in your church. The OGM funds the work of the Ackers and others.

Vol. 6, Ch. 4 - The Peaceable Kingdom 
  • Background Information:
    • Lebanon is a beautiful, mountainous country in the Middle East. It borders Israel, Syria, and the Mediterranean Sea. Lebanon is unique in the Middle East in that it enjoys religious freedom, so the opportunity to speak about Christ openly there is available. While it is one of the top tourist destinations in the Middle East, it has endured conflict and been damaged by war. The people of Lebanon have undergone the threat of war in this volatile region for many years. 
           Chaouki and Maha Boulos are CBF field personnel who are natives of Lebanon. They spent 11 years in North Carolina after they were married because of the dangers of war in Lebanon. In the USA, they were involved in ministry to Arabs. In June 2002, they were commissioned by CBF and returned to their home of Beirut, Lebanon, with their two sons.
           In Beirut and the surrounding area, the Bouloses hold open-air evangelistic meetings called “Celebrate Jesus” revivals. They also conduct sports camps, Vacation Bible Schools, work with orphans, and have an after-school program for the Bedouin gypsy people. Maha works with a women’s ministry in a poor suburb of Beirut. The Bouloses are also constructing a conference and retreat center in the mountains called White Wings to be an oasis of peace for Christian churches, conferences, and seminars.  As youth explore the concept of peace in this chapter, they will learn about the ministry of the Bouloses. During this chapter, pray for peace in Lebanon and the Middle East and for the holistic ministry of the Bouloses. 
  • Web links for more information:
  • Session 1
  • Session 2
  • Session 3
  • Session 4
  • Mission Project: Create a "Sacred Space" in your church building for prayer. Perhaps if your church already has a prayer room, you could create a space just for youth in an area near where your youth meet. Other ideas to consider: a prayer "wall" or bulletin board for prayers to be posted, a way to play meditative music, a cross on the wall, comfortable seating, a kneeling bench, etc...   

Vol. 6, Ch. 5 - Rising from the Rubble 
Vol. 6, Ch. 6 - Growing in God's Grace
  • Background Information:
    • In 2008, CBF began a partnership with the Ghana Baptist Convention. Together, these two organizations assist one another in prayer, church planting, leadership development, ministry infrastructure, community transformation, and facilitating church-to-church connections.
           In 2010, the Ghana Baptist Convention appointed the Rev. Dr. Robert Owusu to be the church planter-facilitator for North America. His job is to work to establish Ghanaian Baptist congregations in North America. He also pastors Amazing Grace Baptist Church in Atlanta, GA, a Ghanaian church. CBF partners with the Ghana Baptist Convention and Rev. Dr. Owusu by providing funds, networking links, office space, and other resources for the church-starting initiative. 
           Many Ghanaians come to the U.S. for economic, educational, and family reasons. They work in fields of medicine, education, and the service industry. Ghanaians who come to the U.S. generally work and live in larger cities. There are member churches of the Ghana Baptist Convention in New York, Massachusetts, Virginia, Ohio, Colorado, Georgia, and Canada. However, there are many other places in North America where Ghanaians have settled.
           The church starting process begins with Robert connecting with Ghanaian communities and associations. He makes phone calls to gather information about the communities and names of people to connect with in the city. Once he finds a concentration of Ghanaian and other West Africans in a city, that area is given priority for a new church start. Robert and CBF need each other in this process. Robert is able to make connections with these communities and CBF provides networking assistance with CBF area coordinators and churches where the church start is needed. Robert’s goal is to plant eight Ghanaian Baptist churches in North America by 2013. He is working with CBF connections in Texas, Oklahoma, and Illinois to begin congregations. It is through partnerships like this and through God's grace that Baptist Christians can accomplish things in Christ’s name that we could not accomplish on our own. 
  • Web links for more information:
  • Session 1
  • Session 2
  • Mission Projects: Involve youth in planning a church worship service for nursing home residents using the guide provided. If you have a small youth group, invite other members of the church to participate.

Vol. 6, Ch. 7 - We're a Happy Family 
  • Background Information:
    • When many people think of Miami, Florida, they think of miles of beaches, sparkling waters, multi-million dollar sports stars, and a vibrant nightlife and club scene. But Miami-Dade County is also home to Overtown, one of the most impoverished communities in America. Overtown was founded in the 1890s by many of the African Americans who were building Miami’s railroads. The community was a flourishing and celebrated center of African American life until the 1960s, when newly constructed highways dissected Overtown and negatively impacted its population and economy.
      CBF and numerous partner churches and organizations have made a commitment to serving this poverty-stricken community through Touching Miami with Love (TML). TML’s mission is to share the love of Christ by offering hope, opportunities, and resources to individuals and families who are faced with poverty, substandard housing, failed education, and constant exposure to violence and crime. Integral to this mission are two of CBF’s field personnel, Jason and Angel Pittman, who serve as Executive Director and Director of Development and Volunteers, respectively. Jason and Angel choose to live in the community in which they serve. Living among the residents of Overtown builds solidarity and trust that give the Pittmans even more opportunities to share who Christ is with their neighbors. “You cannot be the presence of Christ if you’re not willing to be present,” Angel said.
      Touching Miami with Love provides a number of services for the Overtown community, including tax preparation assistance, fax and copying services, and helping residents connect to various government social programs. Perhaps the way TML makes the most difference in the community is through its programs for the children and youth of Overtown. Through after-school activities and summer camps, TML provides children and youth a safe environment in which to learn valuable skills and explore who God wants them to be. Children in the ToMorrow’s Leaders program receive instruction in literacy, math, computers, social skills, physical fitness, and various creative arts. Through the Today’s Leaders Youth Development Program, middle and high school students participate in life skills classes, character education, computer class, recreational activities, entrepreneurial projects, and creative arts opportunities. The staff, volunteers, and partners of TML know that these children and youth can have a great impact on transforming the future of the Overtown community, and TML wants to give them the best possible tools and resources to help them navigate a sometimes difficult and unstable world. TML embodies the love of Christ by nurturing and mentoring these young people and developing relationships within the community that witness to God’s love and care for all God’s children.
  • Web links for more information:
  • Session 1
    • equip - Video on Touching Miami with Love 
  • Session 2
  • Session 3
  • Session 4
    • engageLearn more about Clarence Jordan and Koinonia, Watch a video, Visit the Facebook page
  • Mission Projects: Choose one of two options: Either plan an intergenerational dinner with senior adults in your congregation or in your local community, or order and view a documentary on Koinonia Farms and plan a discussion to go along with it. Consider inviting adults in the church or another youth group for the documentary viewing and discussion.


Vol. 6, Ch. 8 - How Do You Say...?

  • Background Information:
    • In this chapter, youth will learn about the important work of Fellowship Baptists who are teaching English in China. Learning to speak English is an important skill desired by the Chinese people. Beginning in the third grade students are taught English. Most can read English well, but speaking it is much more difficult. Because students are taught English in school by Chinese teachers they learn a spoken form of “Chinglish.” The ability to speak English leads the Chinese to find Americans to converse with and to study under. The need for American teachers of English provides an important opportunity to those wishing to share the love of Christ with the Chinese.
           In this unit we are learning about the work of four individuals connected with CBF who have used their assignments to teach English to make friends and be the presence of Christ to the Chinese they teach. Cynthia (Cyndi) Levesque, after a successful secular career, was commissioned as a CBF field personnel to teach English in China. Cyndi and her husband, Marc, moved to China in August 2008. Cyndi taught English classes at Guangxi University and also at Gong He Lu Church (a large Chinese protestant church) in Nanning. In September 2010 they moved from their apartment on the university campus and Cyndi began working as a trainer and English teacher at the church. Her responsibilities include continuing the free English classes for the public as well as the church members. She also assists the children’s Chinese Bible study leaders to learn new teaching methods such as puppetry and new craft techniques. Cyndi is able to use the gifts God has given her to make friends and share God’s love.
           Kamille Krahwinkel and her husband Mickael Eyraud were commissioned in June 2010 by the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship to serve in China. Kamille teaches English classes and Mickael is studying Chinese at the university in the Hainan Province. They minister among the college students building relationships, inviting students to their home, and providing extra opportunities to share in English conversation. Mickael and Kamille also spend time each week with the children at an orphanage and leading an English language worship service. Kamille and Mickael are making friends and sharing God’s love in China as they work and serve.
      Another missional person who served in China is Ed Laughridge. Ed retired in 1996 from missionary service. After his church in Atlanta, GA began partnering with a church in China, Ed was asked to go on a 3 week mission trip. After much thought and prayer he went and soon after returning he signed up to teach English to Chinese school teachers seeking to further their education at a university in Bejing. One of Ed’s greatest joys during his time of teaching was making friends with the students in his classes. He continues to have e-mail and other contact with many of the friends he made.
           So we meet four very different people in age, in experience, in background, but all serving as Christ’s ambassadors while teaching English in China. Through teaching and ministering, they are building friendships and are being the presence of Christ.
  • Web links for more information:
  • Session 1
  • Session 3
  • Mission Project
    • The Laundromat Love project requires pre-planning. Recruit adult chaperones to help youth do the laundry properly. An adaption of this project that involves less planning and resources would be to have a free lemonade stand at a ballpark and pass out cold lemonade along with cards that say "This lemonade is free for those God loves. That includes you!"

 



Vol. 6, Ch. 9 - Words of Welcome

  • Background Information:
    • Bosnia is a small country located in Europe populated by over 3,000,000 people and surrounded by mountains. This country that covers almost 20,000 square miles is home to four different ethnic groups, including the Bosniaks, the Croats, the Serbs, and the Romany people. These various ethnic groups practice a variety of religions, including Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Islam and Roman Catholicism. This country of beautiful rivers and mountains has not been idyllic and peaceful throughout its history. In fact, the ethnic war of 1992-1995 caused much conflict and turmoil for many Bosnians. Hoping for a new start, many of these people resettled to America. Thousands sought refugee status and were resettled to St. Louis, Missiouri. In this large metropolitan city, almost 50,000 residents are Bosnians who have come to St. Louis looking for a life of hope and prosperity.   
      The people of Kirkwood Baptist Church in St. Louis have opened their doors to their Bosnian refugee neighbors. When Kirkwood heard how CBF is ministering to the Romany Gypsy people in Bosnia, they considered planning a trip of their own. However, they soon realized that there was a mission field at their doors in St. Louis. Without having to travel hundreds of miles, Kirkwood began to develop ministries that would welcome and assist these refugees, showing them God’s love along the way. Kirkwood’s ministers, including Scott Stearman and Daniel Johnson, are particularly committed to leading their congregation to minister to the Bosnian people. In addition, other churches in the St. Louis area have joined in this important work with Kirkwood.  Mira and Sasha Zivanov, originally from Serbia and Austria, were involved with the Bosnian refugees and were called by Kirkwood Baptist and commissioned as CBF field personnel to lead in the outreach ministries to the refugee community. In this unit, youth will learn about how Kirkwood Baptist is being the hands and feet of Christ in St. Louis. Youth will also learn that it is not necessary to travel overseas to do “mission work” for Christ. The work of God in the world surrounds us in our very own neighborhoods.
  • Web links for more information:
  • Session 1
  • Session 2
  • Session 3
    • engage - "Strangers No More" clip
  • Session 4

Vol. 6, Ch. 10 - Education is a Bridge

  • Background Information:
    • In 2002, a partnership between Buckner International, Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, and later Literacy Connexus was developed to form "KidsHeart" to serve the poorest counties of Texas. The people there are Hispanic and many are recently immigrated to the United States to give their children a better future. People live in colonias (Spanish for "neighborhood") which is usually made up of families of very low income lacking safe, sanitary housing or basic services like potable water, sewage systems, and paved roads. Large numbers of children are affected by poverty in these counties.
           CBF works primarily to recruit and prepare churches to engage in mission projects along the border, while Buckner works primarily to build local relationships and discover the areas where mission teams can be of assistance. Literacy Connexus joins in to assist with literacy needs. Although schools can be a bright spot in these counties, over half of the Hispanic children in Texas drop out of school. This statistic is even higher in the colonias.
           The work is carried on by small groups of local coordinators that work with churches and community leaders in the targeted counties to identify local needs. These coordinators match needs of the poorest counties with the talents and gifts of people from your church. By meeting these needs church members have opportunities to share the good news about Jesus. About 2,000 volunteers participate in KidsHeart mission projects each year, and the average group size is 20 people. Churches can help through medical and dental work, construction, expanding literacy, in children and youth ministry, and by ministering to adults. Team members experience a growth in their own faith as they minister to others. Church teams can do a solo project, or they can join in with hundreds of other volunteers during the "blitz weeks" at Spring Break and in the summer. In this chapter, youth focus specifically on the ministry of KidsHeart related to education.
  • Web links for more information:
  • Session 1
  • Session 2
  • Session 3
  • Session 4
  • Mission Project: See page 22 of Chapter 10 for instructions on planning a book drive. If you plan to involve the whole congregation, consider showing a Books for the Border video during worship or a fellowship time.

Vol. 6, Ch. 11 - Helping People Help Themselves

  • Background Information:
    • Ethiopia is located on the northeastern side of Africa in an area referred to as the “Horn of Africa.” This African country is roughly the size of Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico combined and is home to close to 70 million people. There are more than 78 ethnic groups represented in Ethiopia, and the two primary religions are Christianity and Islam. The Nile River passes through this country of high mountains, rolling plains, and deep gorges.
           Ethiopia has an ancient history dating back to A.D. 200. There have been continual struggles between leaders and religious groups to control the country. The most recent challenges included a famine in the 1980’s under a harsh government which left many Ethiopians starving. In the 1990’s, a representative government was elected which includes an executive, legislative, and judicial branch. This government has a constitution, a Supreme Court, a prime minister and a president. Though this new form of government is hoping to make significant reforms, the challenges of HIV and the lack of clean water in Ethiopia makes daily living extremely difficult.
            However, there is hope. There are Cooperative Baptist Fellowship (CBF) field personnel who deeply care about the challenges of the Ethiopian people. They include David and Merrie Harding. David lived in Ethiopia as a missionary kid and has since founded an organization called Water is Life International using his educational background in engineering and water science. This organization seeks to find where the greatest need is for clean water and well-drilling in the country. Almost 55 million Ethiopians have no access to clean water, and David refers to this as the “silent tsunami.” Through the work of David and his partners, they are trying to ensure that Ethiopians not only have access to clean water, but also know how to drill and repair water wells themselves to become self-sustaining and confident.
           Women and children in Ethiopia have a particularly difficult life. They often walk miles each day to carry buckets of water weighing close to 50 pounds to their homes. The water that they bring to the families may contain parasites or bacteria that can cause sickness and disease. Left with little time for schooling, the children are often unable to read and write. In fact, only 45 percent of children attend school, and only 65 percent of the entire population can read and write. The women have little time to pursue their own interests or earn money for their families, since they spend such vast amounts of energy securing water for daily use.
           Though the situation seems desperate, Water is Life International has drilled almost 200 wells in Ethiopia. The cost of providing water for one person per year is only $1. The Hardings are sharing God’s love and hope through clean water and inviting all of us to share in that journey with them.
  • Web links for more information:
  • Session 1
  • Session 2
  • Session 3
  • Session 4
  • Mission Project: During this chapter, you may choose one or both of the two suggested mission projects. Partnering with a Local Ministry is introduced in Session 2 and Becoming a Micro-lender is introduced in Session 3. If possible, select a local ministry with which your church has previously or continuously partnered. There is value in building upon long-lasting partnerships! In selecting a story for a micro-loan, encourage youth to become invested in a project which interests them.

Vol. 6, Ch. 12 - Called to the Forgotten

  • Background Information:
    • The days of moving to a remote town overseas where ministry will be centered on one group of people in one particular town or village are gone. Today’s Cooperative Baptist Fellowship’s Field Personnel are given the challenge to serve in different towns, meet drastically different needs, and be ready to face any new assignment that comes their way.  Blake and Bekah Hart are a part of this new generation of Field Personnel.
           As natives of North Carolina, Blake and Bekah met at Mars Hill College’s Baptist Student Union College Ministry. After serving in different ministries in Ecuador Blake and Bekah knew that serving God full time in South America was their calling. After Blake and Bekah were married they moved to Atlanta where Bekah worked for Cooperative Baptist Fellowship while Blake earned his Master’s of Divinity at McAfee School of Theology. During this time, the Harts continued to listen to God and others seeking to serve where they were most needed. Soon it became clear that they were being called to Northern Chile.  
           Commissioned in 2010, the Harts work in a variety of ministry situations. One of their main focuses is with the Aymara people group. Situated in the Andes Mountains, the Aymara’s isolated location has made life hard and challenging. As a result, the Aymara children are sent to a boarding school in Ticnamar where they are somewhat forgotten by their families. The Harts work with the children at this school helping them stay connected to their families while giving them hope that life is worth living.  
      In the town of Arica Blake and Bekah work with church leaders, aiding them in discipleship training, pastoral care, and develop lay leadership. In both Arica and Ticnamar churches will be planted and the Chileans will discover what their purpose is.
           One the challenges that faced Blake and Bekah in the months leading up to their moving to Chile was money. The Harts worked on a budget, trying to foresee all possible expenses for the first year and the subsequent years to come. Then the quest to raise the money started. Following in the footsteps of so many who came before them, Blake and Bekah sent letters, made phone calls, spoke with small groups and churches, and met with potential financial supporters. This fundraising effort set the timetable for their ministry in Chile to begin. Relying on individuals and churches for their livelihood was a leap of faith for Blake and Bekah and they have seen how this faith has produced many blessings beyond those of the monetary kind. 
           Blake and Bekah feel that they have listened for God’s voice and followed the promptings that God gave them. The Harts know that their ultimate calling is to show the Aymara people that they have a place in God’s world and through work and prayer that place will be discovered. As students consider the Harts' story, they will also explore God's calling for themselves to be the presence of Christ.
  • Web links for more information:
  • Mission Project: Determine a need of a local organization or charity that is often "forgotten" or overlooked or that works with an under-served community. Consider how God might be calling your group to meet this need. Be creative in deciding how the unique gifts and skills of your group members can be used.

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